Book Writing Tips from A Fantasy Writer

Book Writing Tips from A Fantasy Writer

As a writer, there are certain things you must will yourself to do very often. There are countless tricks to avoiding writers block, staying productive, and to even keep your creative juices flowing throughout a period of writing. Some work, others do not, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t share the book writing tips that have worked for me over the past year.

#1 – Write Every Day, No Matter What

This one is simple, never stop writing. You wont always be able to sit down and pump out pages for your book, blog, etc., but you can always write something and that will keep your brain activity in the place it needs to be. On days I can’t think of detail for my book, I will write side stories, songs, prophecies, you name it. Anything that could potentially be used later on, even if only a 1% chance, is better than not writing anything at all!

#2 – If You’re on a Roll, Don’t Stop

I’ve made this mistake a few times now and it may be the worst feeling in the world once you realize what you did. You’ll be 10 pages deep after an hour of work, everything is just pouring out of you, and someone calls your phone. Rather than ignoring it since you’re in the zone, you pick it up and wander away form your screen fro 10-15 minutes. When you finally sit back down, you’ve lost your train of though and any ideas that you had. So now, rather than having that continuous flow you’re trying to remember what you wanted to write about instead. I’m not saying you won’t be able to get back into the flow at all, but nine times out of ten it will actually be the case. So don’t answer that call, don’t take a quick Netflix break, and don’t peel your eyes away from whatever device you’re writing on!

#3 – If You Have Writers Block, Take a Break

Now this is a separate issue from #2. This is for those of us who have ran through the “in the zone” phase and now are drawing more blanks than Old Greg’s Bailey’s watercolor. Once this happens, then its acceptable to take a break. However, don’t go off and do something random and pointless. Try and do something that will get your brain cylinders firing again or something that can inspire you to get back into the zone. Avoid pointless television or movies and step away from your computer if that’s what you’re using to write. Don’t aimlessly scroll through social media either as that is just a distraction that will push you into a void of random nonsense funny cat videos.

#4 – Problems with Your Plan? Stop Planning Then

Another thing I learned very quickly was that planning is not always necessary. This was hard for me to grasp too because I am a massive planner. You should see my outlook calendar at work, hours detailed at levels that shouldn’t be detailed, reminders to run daily reports, notes about writing. It goes on and on too. I’m just a meticulous, detail-oriented, planner who needed to learn that you cannot plan everything when it comes to writing (or at least most of the time you can’t). I started my book with the first chapter to see if I could actually vomit enough info from my brain to complete a chapter. After I succeeded, I began writing descriptions for each and every chapter and how I wanted it the book to go. By chapter three, my brain had already taken me on a different path and 99% of what I planned had to be tossed out the window. So keep that in mind when you’re struggling with planning early on in your creative process.

#5 – Always be on the Lookout for New Material

This kind of goes without saying, but you always, always, always need to keep your eye out for useful material. And with that, always have something on your person, like a phone or a pocket sized notepad, to take notes on for when these situations arise. Then, once these ideas sprout little trees in your brain, you can go research to grow those sproutlings into full grown idea trees!

Writing isn’t easy by any means, but by learning how to manipulate your brains weakest moments you can make it easier. If you follow my book writing tips and mix in a few of your own as you learn the ropes, I can bet you that you’ll hit the ground running much easier than you might think.


Thanks again for reading my article on book writing tips. As always, please leave some feedback and give my page a follow so you can experience all of my content. I’d love to hear from all of my wonderful readers, so be sure to rate/comment often!

Kick Start Your Writing Career

Kick Start Your Writing Career

The thought of trying to find a remote writing job can sometimes be frightening. But, as someone who has over cane these same fears, I’ve decided to put together a list of some of the things I’ve done that helped me land my first gig. A lot of times the most important piece of writing, blogging, or creating content is just sitting down and dedicating time to actually get it done. So don’t be afraid, and with the help of this guide you should be well on your way to starting that illustrious writing career you’ve always wanted. 

Create an UpWork Account

UpWork has probably been my favorite freelance site since I began looking for writing work just four months ago. It is the most user friendly and uses a bidding system for freelancers to land jobs. UpWork does have a limited amount of applies per month, but I personally think that is even better. It really makes you research and find appropriate jobs rather than just willy-nilly applying for everything freelance job. This site also breaks down potential jobs by level: entry, intermediate, and expert levels. Along with that, there are also countless other filters you can apply to search for your ideal first freelance job. 

Another reason UpWork is my favorite site is because it was where I got my first break. There was a smaller company in need of some motivational blog posts that I was lucky enough to get. Granted, I only got to write a handful of posts for them but two of those posts made their way to Medium. This was huge for me, especially as a new writer. For any of you who have already begun your hunt for jobs, I’m sure you’ve noticed that many places require examples of your published work. This is somewhat of a circular reference if you will, since in order to find work you need prior work but you can’t have “prior work” without having prior work (lol). So thankfully these two posts quickly allowed me to move out of that initial search and actually land some work to build more of my resume.

Network, Network, Network

This one is crucial, and maybe even the most crucial for any aspiring bloggers/content creators. This one also came for me with my first few posts, as the smaller motivational site was a great way to get my name out there. This led to other smaller pages reaching out, giving feedback, and asking for assistance on projects. And of course, all of this is very useful for your resume. There’s also the aspect of asking friends to help grow your brand. This can help you reach other networks that you typically may not have reached. So reach out to as many friends, family, and smaller companies as possible to promote your brand while helping others grow theirs. 

Write As Often As Possible

This one may seem obvious, but many don’t realize how much actually goes into writing. You will not always be able to sit down and finish a piece that you start. This post here actually took me multiple times to finish just because I wanted to be sure I had every possible drop of helpful information available for you all. But that’s why constantly writing is so important. I have around fifty unfinished pieces currently stashed within my google docs. And many more ideas and blank pages that still need to be written. Plus, all of this is excluding my book which probably has another 50 pages of notes on top of the 70 I’ve already written. The constant writing only makes you a better as well, which will ultimately help your job hunt reach fruition.

Start A Blog

This may not help all people, but I found it so useful to start my own blog. One thing I would recommend is to avoid labeling your blog right away. I was unsure if I wanted a sports blog, a travel blog, a cooking blog, etc etc. Over the last four months though I’ve decided I don’t want to limit myself to only one thing, which is also how writing in general should be, because I thoroughly enjoy writing about so many different topics. But, by starting a blog you’re slowly growing your brand and gaining more opportunities to land jobs that will get you your published work examples.

My blog was actually one of the things I submitted to the first real writing job I landed a few weeks back. And even though I was applying for a sports writing position, the employer still got to see my style of writing and decided I would be a great fit to the organization. There are countless sites you can use to start a blog too. My personal favorite is WordPress because it has both the entire website aspect of a blog and its own local WordPress community that allows you to have others immediately see your work. This is great for brand growth and for receiving guest post opportunities as well, so don’t be afraid to blog for awhile before you begin the search for freelance work. 

Apply for Everything Entry Level

This falls outside of the UpWork category and more into actual google searching for jobs. Before I found a writing job, I took an hour two three nights a week and applied for just about every entry level remote writing job I could find online. I heard back from a few, and even picked up a small part-time movie review job at one point. But in doing this I also was constantly tweaking and upgrading my resume as I noticed more and more things that companies looked for in their entry level employees. And don’t be afraid to apply for things that you may not be fully qualified either. I’m not saying go apply for a “Experienced Content Manager” position, but anything that can be within reach should be applied for. Even if you get an interview and the company ends up pursuing a different candidate, that is all experience you can learn and grow from!

There are thousands upon thousands of opportunities out there for all of you who are starting to look for jobs that start this new chapter of your life, and I genuinely hope this post sheds some light on things for you! As somewhat of a fairly new writer still myself, I’d love to help in any way I can. If you have ideas for guest posts, reach out. If you have any questions on what I covered, email me. I know I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am today without the people who helped me, so I am more than willing to return the favor to any of you out there who may need it. 

Thanks for reading my article on Kick Starting Your Writing Career! As always, please leave some feedback and give my page a follow so you get to experience all of my content. I’d love to get some feedback and hear from all of you wonderful readers, so be sure to rate/comment often 🙂

Kick Starting Your Writing Career

Kick Starting Your Writing Career

The thought of trying to find a remote writing job can sometimes be frightening. But, as someone who has over cane these same fears, I’ve decided to put together a list of some of the things I’ve done that helped me land my first gig. A lot of times the most important piece of writing, blogging, or creating content is just sitting down and dedicating time to actually get it done. So don’t be afraid, and with the help of this guide you should be well on your way to starting that illustrious writing career you’ve always wanted. 

Create an Upwork Account

Upwork has probably been my favorite freelance site since I began looking for writing work just four months ago. It is the most user friendly and uses a bidding system for freelancers to land jobs. It does have a limited amount of applies per month, but I personally think that is even better. It really makes you research and find appropriate jobs rather than just willy-nilly applying for everything freelance job. This site also breaks down potential jobs by level: entry, intermediate, and expert levels. Along with that, there are also countless other filters you can apply to search for your ideal first freelance job. 

Another reason Upwork is my favorite site is because it was where I got my first break. There was a smaller company in need of some motivational blog posts that I was lucky enough to get. Granted, I only got to write a handful of posts for them but two of those posts made their way to Medium. This was huge for me, especially as a new writer. For any of you who have already begun your hunt for jobs, I’m sure you’ve noticed that many places require examples of your published work. This is somewhat of a circular reference if you will, since in order to find work you need prior work but you can’t have “prior work” without having prior work (lol). So thankfully these two posts quickly allowed me to move out of that initial search and actually land some work to build more of my resume.

Network, Network, Network

This one is crucial, and maybe even the most crucial for any aspiring bloggers/content creators. This one also came for me with my first few posts, as the smaller motivational site was a great way to get my name out there. This led to other smaller pages reaching out, giving feedback, and asking for assistance on projects. And of course, all of this is very useful for your resume. There’s also the aspect of asking friends to help grow your brand. This can help you reach other networks that you typically may not have reached. So reach out to as many friends, family, and smaller companies as possible to promote your brand while helping others grow theirs. 

Write As Often As Possible

This one may seem obvious, but many don’t realize how much actually goes into writing. You will not always be able to sit down and finish a piece that you start. This post here actually took me multiple times to finish just because I wanted to be sure I had every possible drop of helpful information available for you all. But that’s why constantly writing is so important. I have around fifty unfinished pieces currently stashed within my google docs. And many more ideas and blank pages that still need to be written. Plus, all of this is excluding my book which probably has another 50 pages of notes on top of the 70 I’ve already written. The constant writing only makes you a better as well, which will ultimately help your job hunt reach fruition.

Start A Blog

This may not help all people, but I found it so useful to start my own blog. One thing I would recommend is to avoid labeling your blog right away. I was unsure if I wanted a sports blog, a travel blog, a cooking blog, etc etc. Over the last four months though I’ve decided I don’t want to limit myself to only one thing, which is also how writing in general should be, because I thoroughly enjoy writing about so many different topics. But, by starting a blog you’re slowly growing your brand and gaining more opportunities to land jobs that will get you your published work examples.

My blog was actually one of the things I submitted to the first real writing job I landed a few weeks back. And even though I was applying for a sports writing position, the employer still got to see my style of writing and decided I would be a great fit to the organization. There are countless sites you can use to start a blog too. My personal favorite is WordPress because it has both the entire website aspect of a blog and its own local WordPress community that allows you to have others immediately see your work. This is great for brand growth and for receiving guest post opportunities as well, so don’t be afraid to blog for awhile before you begin the search for freelance work. 

Apply for Everything Entry Level

This falls outside of the Upwork category and more into actual google searching for jobs. Before I found a writing job, I took an hour two three nights a week and applied for just about every entry level remote writing job I could find online. I heard back from a few, and even picked up a small part-time movie review job at one point. But in doing this I also was constantly tweaking and upgrading my resume as I noticed more and more things that companies looked for in their entry level employees. And don’t be afraid to apply for things that you may not be fully qualified either. I’m not saying go apply for a “Experienced Content Manager” position, but anything that can be within reach should be applied for. Even if you get an interview and the company ends up pursuing a different candidate, that is all experience you can learn and grow from!

There are thousands upon thousands of opportunities out there for all of you who are starting to look for jobs that start this new chapter of your life, and I genuinely hope this post sheds some light on things for you! As somewhat of a fairly new writer still myself, I’d love to help in any way I can. If you have ideas for guest posts, reach out. If you have any questions on what I covered, email me. I know I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am today without the people who helped me, so I am more than willing to return the favor to any of you out there who may need it. 

Thanks for reading my article on Kick Starting Your Writing Career! As always, please leave some feedback and give my page a follow so you get to experience all of my content. I’d love to get some feedback and hear from all of you wonderful readers, so be sure to rate/comment often 🙂

My Weekly Review (#13) – UpWork

My Weekly Review (#13) – UpWork

For this week’s recommendation I wanted to talk a little about UpWork. It is a freelance job site that allows you to spend credits for a wide array of jobs. You can find anything from building Excel tables to writing novels, and it is incredibly simple to use. I’m not sure where my writing career would be if I hadn’t stumbled across this wonderful site and I can’t wait to hear how much it helps everyone else!

This site was what actually got my writing career under way almost five months ago. It all started with one or two small copy writing jobs before someone was kind enough to take a chance on me with a few small articles. Both of those articles were published to Medium (#1 and #2) and I could not have been more proud of myself. After a month or so working for that first company, I picked up a second gig writing summaries of Netflix shows. That has quickly evolved into detailed listicle writing and in depth breakdowns of some of my favorite video games too.

From there came my first real writing “job” however. With a fully functioning blog site, some published articles, and a fresh resume I was able to land a sports writing job. Basically a dream come true if you ask me! So with all of that being said, for any of you who are new to writing (or even if you just aren’t sure how to land that first job), be sure to go check out UpWork.

My Weekly Recommendation (#13)

My Weekly Recommendation (#13) – Upwork

For this week’s recommendation I wanted to talk a little about Upwork. It is a freelance job site that allows you to spend credits for a wide array of jobs. You can find anything from building Excel tables to writing novels, and it is incredibly simple to use. I’m not sure where my writing career would be if I hadn’t stumbled across this wonderful site and I can’t wait to hear how much it helps everyone else!

This site was what actually got my writing career under way almost five months ago. It all started with one or two small copy writing jobs before someone was kind enough to take a chance on me with a few small articles. Both of those articles were published to Medium (#1 and #2) and I could not have been more proud of myself. After a month or so working for that first company, I picked up a second gig writing summaries of Netflix shows. That has quickly evolved into detailed listicle writing and in depth breakdowns of some of my favorite video games too. 

From there came my first real writing “job” however. With a fully functioning blog site, some published articles, and a fresh resume I was able to land a sports writing job. Basically a dream come true if you ask me! So with all of that being said, for any of you who are new to writing (or even if you just aren’t sure how to land that first job), be sure to go check out Upwork.

How to Budget as a Twenty-Something Post Grad

How to Budget as a Twenty-Something Post Grad

As a twenty-six-year-old post-grad, I understand the struggle of trying to get your bank account to not look extremely pathetic. I’ve just recently climbed out of the hole that life had put me in and decided to start planning where my money goes a little better. Now, I’m a finance guy who has always been good with numbers and planning, but life comes at you unexpectedly sometimes and drains away what you’ve already saved. Over the last few months, I’ve noticed some things that are tremendously beneficial to saving though, and decided I would go ahead and share those budget tips with you now.

The Big Green E

Excel Budgeting

Excel is a daunting piece of software to many people, but it really shouldn’t be. It is such a great tool to have and there are countless tutorials on how to effectively utilize the program. Currently, it is the only way I budget because it allows me to constantly change and tweak what I need based off of what is actually happening in my life. It also offers the flexibility of more than just a monthly check as many sites/apps do. I currently have my budget broken out by pay period, so I can factor in which paychecks will be hit with the most bills. This allows me to subsequently see where and when I have the most money to save or even pay off something I didn’t think I would be able to pay off until the next month or so. And as I mentioned previously, as things change (unexpected pet bills, car problems, etc.) and Excel allows me to truly see how that affects my budget almost immediately.

Saving & Budgeting Apps

Any app or site where you can track your money can be helpful if used properly. Of course, many of our bank accounts also utilize some of these functions, but they aren’t always as fluid or easy to work with as the app versions. The app I have been using as of late is Truebill, and what drew me towards it was its recurring charges functionality. I’ll admit, I have quite a few subscriptions that hit me every month. I also had some that were coming out of my account every three months or so that I wouldn’t ever really notice due to their infrequent withdrawals. Truebill puts all of these recurring charges on one page though which makes it very easy to see what you still use and what you don’t. They also have a really neat function where they will call and cancel the items you no longer use!

If you’re looking for some really top of the line apps to invest your savings, check these incredible robo-advisors out. There are options for all budget types, people, and savings increments!

The Golden Budgeting Rule

Golden Rule of Budgeting

Depending on who you ask the golden rule of saving/budgeting may differ, but I would guarantee you that more than two-thirds of all professionals would tell you that the 50/20/30 rule is crucial to planning for your future. This rule ultimately is that 50% of your monthly income will be applied to fixed costs (such as rent, utilities, etc.), 20% will immediately go into your savings, and the last 30% is your “fun money” or money that you have for spending. This rule works most effectively when you keep the percent’s in this order as well because you automatically account for 70% of your monthly income being gone before you spend anything. Personally, I like to break these down by pay period as well because I feel it allows me to see where and when I will be cutting it close. But whether done monthly, bi-weekly, or even quarterly, this method is a great way to start looking at how you budget your money.

Other General Budget Advice

One of the other key things I always try to do is overestimate my outgoing expenses. Since I have started doing this, I virtually never cut myself short and always have more than enough planned out for bills. Plus, it is very nice when you approach the end of the month and see that your account is higher than you anticipated it would be! I also have weekly and bi-weekly reminders set to adjust my Excel budgets just to make sure I am keeping up with my planning even during the busiest of times. My final piece of advice is to not be afraid of doing things that can save you money in the long run. I know once we are out of our parents’ houses we never want to go back, but sometimes a few months back at home can save absurd amounts of money. For example, say you are bringing in $1,000 a paycheck or $2,000 a month, and your rent is $750. That is already roughly 38% of your fixed costs for the month, and if you move back home for 6 months you just saved yourself $4,500! So, no matter what or how you are currently budgeting just know this; life can be hard sometimes, but as long as you follow a few simple tips you can always boost your bank account.


Thanks again for reading my how to guide on budgeting. As always, please leave some feedback and give my page a follow so you can experience all of my content. I’d love to hear from all of my wonderful readers, so be sure to rate/comment often!

My Inspiration Behind Writing

My Inspiration Behind Writing

Over my life, I have encountered numerous things that have inspired me. When I was in high school, being cut from the baseball team was my inspiration to lose weight. When I was cleaning pools after college, I was inspired to score higher on the GRE in order to get into graduate school. The list is almost endless, but as of late my main inspiration has been to write. This is a huge new step in my life, as I am currently a full-time financial analyst who has a psych degree, a master’s in finance, and very little writing experience. However, even though I seem to be behind the eight ball with these new goals of mine I am still beyond excited to begin this journey into the land of writing.

How A Joke About Game of Thrones Inspired Me

The first thing that inspired me to write was actually a small joke I made to my girlfriend. As I’m sure most of you already know, roughly two months ago Game of Thrones was starting back up again. I was beyond excited, but with all that excitement came a substantial amount of worry and panic. I had so many questions on how the season would end, which of my favorite characters would end up dead, and how I would take not having any more Game of Throne Sundays to look forward to ever again. So, I sarcastically said that I was going to create my own GOT-esque realm to ease the pain that I would begin feeling the second the finale ended in mid-May. Two months later, I have five chapters complete, an entire map of my realm drawn and planned, twenty documents filled with detail that will eventually be expanded upon in the book itself, and my own website where a lot of my ideas can be found. Since that idea sprouted in my head, I have done nothing but write in my spare time. And all the time I can’t spend writing just inspires me to write even more.

The Woes of Corporate Life

The next thing that really propelled me off the cliff and into the depths of writing was my job. I have been a financial analyst for two and a half years now, but I haven’t been enjoying it as much as I thought I would. I’ve always been a math guy, and I am great at my job, but I hate the fact that I have to sit behind a desk every day from 9-5. My true career goal is to at some point work remote, and with writing, I can see that happening before I land a remote finance job. The corporate world is beginning to see the benefits of allowing their employees to work from home, but it is happening at an unbearably sluggish pace. Yes, I know there are tons of places that are more innovative and flexible towards remote work or at least having a set number of remote days a year, but those jobs typically aren’t available to people with just under three years of experience. With writing though it feels different. I’ve already made more money in the first two months than I was planning on making in my entire first year, and once you have your name out there with some good pieces getting published it is much easier to land a remote writing gig. But the fact that I still have to go sit behind that desk every day and only get a few to write may be the biggest motivation for me to succeed as a writer.

Inspiration in My Significant Other

My last, but definitely not least, motivation is my girlfriend. She has been there since the initial spark for the book that leads to the blogging, which led to most of my post work time is devoted to writing or research for writing and hasn’t complained once. In fact, she has been so supportive it is unbelievable. She wants to see me succeed just as much as I want myself to succeed in this industry, and I couldn’t love her more for it. She pushes me to be the best that I can be, and that makes this stab at a new career that much more rewarding. I recently read a quote that was very similar to something she told me in the early stages of this journey. The quote by Louis L’Amour reads, “Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” When I told her my original idea for a novel and started putting words on paper, she told me to go for it. And that may be the most inspiration I have experienced yet in my entire life.

Thanks for taking a dive into my life and how I draw inspiration for all of my writing. As always, please leave some feedback and give my page a follow so you can experience all of my content. I’d love to hear where all of my wonderful readers draw their inspiration from, so be sure to rate/comment!

Inspirations Behind Writing (6/24/19)

[Originally published on 6/24/19 on my previous site, Bright-blood.com]

Inspirations Behind Writing

Over my life, I have encountered numerous things that have inspired me. When I was in high school, being cut from the baseball team inspired me to lose weight. When I was cleaning pools after college, I was inspired to score higher on the GRE in order to get into graduate school. The list is almost endless, but as of late my main inspiration has been to write. This is a huge new step in my life, as I am currently a full-time financial analyst who has a psych degree, a master’s in finance, and very little writing experience. However, even though I seem to be behind the eight ball with these new goals of mine I am still beyond excited to begin this journey into the land of writing.

A Joke About Game of Thrones

The first thing that inspired me to write was actually a small joke I made to my girlfriend. As I’m sure most of you already know, roughly two months ago Game of Thrones was starting back up again. I was beyond excited, but with all that excitement came a substantial amount of worry and panic. I had so many questions on how the season would end, which of my favorite characters would end up dead, and how I would take not having any more Game of Throne Sundays to look forward to ever again. So, I sarcastically said that I was going to create my own GOT-esque realm to ease the pain that I would begin feeling the second the finale ended in mid-May. Two months later, I have five chapters complete, an entire map of my realm drawn and planned, twenty documents filled with detail that will eventually be expanded upon in the book itself, and my own website where a lot of my ideas can be found. Since that idea sprouted in my head I have done nothing but write in my spare time, and all the time I can’t use to write I still only want to write!

The Woes of Corporate Life

The next thing that really propelled me off the cliff and into the depths of writing was my job. I have been a financial analyst for two and a half years now, but I haven’t been enjoying it as much as I thought I would. I’ve always been a math guy, and I am great at my job, but I hate the fact that I have to sit behind a desk every day from 9-5. My true career goal is to at some point work remote, and with writing, I can see that happening before I land a remote finance job. The corporate world is beginning to see the benefits of allowing their employees to work from home, but it is happening at an unbearably sluggish pace. Yes, I know there are tons of places that are more innovative and flexible towards remote work or at least having a set number of remote days a year, but those jobs typically aren’t available to people with just under three years of experience. With writing though it feels different. I’ve already made more money in the first two months than I was planning on making in my entire first year, and once you have your name out there with some good pieces getting published it is much easier to land a remote writing gig. But the fact that I still have to go sit behind that desk every day and only get a few to write may be the biggest motivation for me to succeed as a writer.

My Significant Other

My last, but definitely not least, motivation is my girlfriend. She has been there since the initial spark for the book that leads to the blogging, which led to most of my post work time is devoted to writing or research for writing and hasn’t complained once. In fact, she has been so supportive it is unbelievable. She wants to see me succeed just as much as I want myself to succeed in this industry, and I couldn’t love her more for it. She pushes me to be the best that I can be, and that makes this stab at a new career that much more rewarding. I recently read a quote that was very similar to something she told me in the early stages of this journey. The quote by Louis L’Amour reads, “Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.” When I told her my original idea for a novel and started putting words on paper, she told me to go for it. And that may be the most inspirational thing I have experienced yet in my entire life.

Preparing for an Interview

Interviews can be daunting. As you ‘re graduating college, or even just moving on to bigger and better things throughout your career, you will be faced with countless interviews at many different companies. These can be extremely stressful, but fret no more! The below list will help de-stress any interview process you may be soon nearing, and hopefully will land you that dream job you’re looking to grab.

Step 1: Understand Each and Every Piece of the Job Description

Understanding the job description forwards and backwards can be a much larger help than one might think. In knowing what a company is truly looking for in their ideal candidate, you open yourself up to getting asked the right questions during your interview. As a quick example, if Company XYZ is looking for someone who can step into and evaluate VBA within excel, and you have no idea what any of that even remotely means, they could write off your interview very early on and start asking irrelevant questions that have no relevance to the job opening. Whereas if you explain that you don’t have too much experience within that area but you know of it and are willing to learn it before/as you start the position, your interview could continue moving in the right direction. Also, knowing the ins-and-outs of the position allow you to have less anxiety over the questions a company may ask!

Step 2: Research The Company

Step 2 essentially goes hand in hand with Step 1. By knowing more than just the general detail of the company you are interviewing with, you allow yourself to understand job descriptions better, understand general nonsense the interviewer may be spouting out about the company, and will even be able to ask better questions when the interview is coming to a close. Not to mention, the latter of those three options is one of few things that can really make you stand out as a potential candidate. Showing that willingness/excitement about the company before you even start could push a second or third string candidate up to the top of the list! All of this, once again, may lead to less anxiousness throughout the entire interview as well, since you wont be focused on hoping that one specific question may not be asked.

Step 3: Practice Potential Interview Questions

This step may seem unnecessary and unbearably repetitive for some of you out there about to interview, but it could make all the difference for those of you that have severe anxiety before interviews. By practicing the answers to potential questions (check out these potential interview questions, they’re some really great ones to practice!), or even doing a full mock interview with a friend, you begin eliminating any doubts associated with your answers from your mind. This will also give your answers a bit of confidence, which also typically plays very well in interviews.

Step 4: Prepare Questions for Interviewer

This is one of those areas that never ceases to impress the interviewer if done properly. If you have a few solid questions that dive beyond the typical pay scale, work hours, or other generic types of questions you WILL stick out to your interviewer. I have tried to do some background research that digs beneath the surface for most of my interviews, such as the charitable contributions or what types of software they’re using within the company. That, of course, can also lead to other questions from the interviewer that can showcase your skills even more!

Step 5: Print Copies of Your Resume & Get Ready to Kill It!

This step varies, but you always want to make sure you will have enough resumes to go around a room for a potential group interview. I have never witnessed more than six people in a room interviewing at once, but that is not to say you only ever need six resumes. Also, your resume should always be up to date and as honest as possible. If you do not posses a skill then absolutely DO NOT put that you have that skill. That can be a complete interview killer and completely mar any of your other skills. You will be better off leaving that one specific skill a company may be looking for off the resume and just explaining your willingness to learn it rather than saying you know how to do it and getting completely embarrassed when they prove that you don’t actually know how.


By following these five steps above, you should be well on your way to landing that job you’re interviewing for! I’d love to see all of your other tips and tricks for interviews, so be sure to leave those in the comments section below. Thanks again for the read, and be sure to check out the rest of my content here.